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Ithaca Music Forum: Following a Song Across the Pacific

How did an African American spiritual take on new meanings in the Australian Outback? Dr. Gabriel Solis (University of Illinois) weaves this unique ethnomusicological tale of one song's journey through space and time, and the changes it underwent.

JOIN US FOR THE LAST ITHACA MUSIC FORUM OF THE 2017-2018 YEAR!
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A scholar of African American music and of Indigenous musics of the Southwestern Pacific, Gabriel Solis has done ethnographic and historical research with jazz musicians in the United States and with musicians in Australia and Papua New Guinea. Drawing on work in African American studies, anthropology, and history, he addresses the ways people engage the past, performing history and memory through music.

Additionally, his work explores musicians' and audiences' interactions with and personalization of mass-mediated musical commodities in transnational circulation. He has received the Wenner Gren Foundation's Hunt Fellowship, the Arnold O. Beckman Fellowship for distinguished research, the Madden Fellowship for research in technology and the arts, an Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities fellowship, and most recently a Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory senior fellowship. He received the honorable mention for the Society for Ethnomusicology's Jaap Kunst Prize for "Artisanship, Innovation, and Indigenous Modernity in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea: Ataizo Mutahe's Flutes," in 2013. His articles have appeared in The Musical Quarterly, Ethnomusicology, the Journal of the Royal Musical Association, the Journal of Popular Music Studies, Popular Music and Society, Musicultures, and a number of edited collections.

He is the author of a book on contemporary performances of Thelonious Monk's music, titled Monk's Music: Thelonious Monk and Jazz History in the Making (University of California Press, 2007), and a book on John Coltrane and Thelonious Monk's work together in the late-1950s (Oxford University Press, 2013), and co-editor with Bruno Nettl of a collection of essays on improvisation cross-culturally. He is currently working on a book on Tom Waits and the theatrics of masculinity, and on a study of the history of connections between artists and activists in Australia and Papua New Guinea and their counterparts in the African diaspora, titled The Black Pacific.

In addition to jazz, Dr. Solis has studied capoeira with Contramestre Dennis Chiaramonte of Livre como Vento, Professor Doutor of ASCAB and Instructor Macaquinho of Capoeira Angola Palmares.

Thursday, April 19 at 5:00pm

Whalen Center for Music, McHenry Lobbty

Event Type

Performance, Speaker/Lecture/Discussion

Schools

School of Music

Departments/Offices

Music

Cost

Free to the public

Contact Email:

drifkin@ithaca.edu

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